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Zechariah 9:9 1
9 Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Zion! Shout, Daughter of Jerusalem! See, your king comes to you, righteous and having salvation, gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

clip_image048Background

Zechariah was a prophet from 520 BC to 518 BC in Jerusalem, about 2500 years ago. During that era, many Jews were returning from the Babylonian Captivity to rebuild Jerusalem and the Temple, which had been destroyed by the Babylonians.

Zechariah, the son of Iddo, was instrumental in inspiring his fellow Jews to rebuild the Temple (see Ezra 6:14).

Zechariah began prophesying during the same year as the prophet Haggai, in about 520 BC. Zechariah’s prophecies came from visions that showed God’s power, God’s judgment of sin, the importance of spiritual strength, and the promise of things to come, including the promise of the Messiah.

Zechariah’s prophecies often looked far into the future, a future in which the Jews would again be exiled from their homeland and scattered throughout the world. His prophecies said that Jews would be persecuted worldwide, that Jerusalem would become a battleground of nations, and that Jerusalem would become the religious center of the world.

Zechariah, means “Yah has remembered”. The Bible’s book of Zechariah is the 11th book of the twelve minor prophets.

Biblical Truths 2

King James study material
9. From the coming of the Grecian conqueror, Zechariah makes a sudden transition, by the prophetical law of suggestion, to the coming of King Messiah, a very different character.
daughter of Zion–The theocratic people is called to “rejoice” at the coming of her King (Ps 2:11).

unto thee–He comes not for His own gain or pleasure, as earthly kings come, but for the sake of His Church: especially for the Jews’ sake, at His second coming (Ro 11:26).

he is just–righteous: an attribute constantly given to Messiah (Isa 45:21; 53:11; Jer 23:5, 6) in connection with salvation. He does not merely pardon by conniving at sin, but He justifies by becoming the Lord our righteousness fulfiller, so that not merely mercy, but justice, requires the justification of the sinner who by faith becomes one with Christ. God’s justice is not set aside by the sinner’s salvation, but is magnified and made honorable by it (Isa 42:1, 21). His future reign “in righteousness,” also, is especially referred to (Isa 32:1).

having salvation–not passively, as some interpret it, “saved,” which the context, referring to a “king” coming to reign, forbids; also the old versions, the Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate, give Saviour. The Hebrew is reflexive in sense, “showing Himself a Saviour; . . . having salvation in Himself” for us. Endowed with a salvation which He bestows as a king. Compare Margin, “saving Himself.” Compare Mt 1:21, in the Greek, “Himself shall save His people”; that is, not by any other, but by Himself shall He save [PEARSON On the Creed]. His “having salvation” for others manifested that He had in Himself that righteousness which was indispensable for the justification of the unrighteous (1Co 1:30; 2Co 5:21; 1Jo 2:1). This contrasts beautifully with the haughty Grecian conqueror who came to destroy, whereas Messiah came to save. Still, Messiah shall come to take “just” vengeance on His foes, previous to His reign of peace (Mal 4:1, 2).

lowly–mild, gentle: corresponding to His “riding on an ass” (not a despised animal, as with us; nor a badge of humiliation, for princes in the East rode on asses, as well as low persons, Jud 5:10), that is, coming as “Prince of peace” (Zec 9:10; Isa 9:6); the “horse,” on the contrary is the emblem of war, and shall therefore be “cut off.” Perhaps the Hebrew includes both the “lowliness” of His outward state (which applies to His first coming) and His “meekness” of disposition, as Mt 21:5 quotes it (compare Mt 11:29), which applies to both His comings. Both adapt Him for loving sympathy with us men; and at the same time are the ground of His coming manifested exaltation (Joh 5:27; Php 2:7-9).

colt–untamed, “whereon yet never man sat” (Lu 19:30). The symbol of a triumphant conqueror and judge (Jud 5:10; 10:4; 12:14).

foal of an ass–literally, “asses”: in Hebrew idiom, the indefinite plural for singular (so Ge 8:4, “mountains of Ararat,” for one of the mountains). The dam accompanied the colt (Mt 21:2). The entry of Jesus into Jerusalem at His first coming is a pledge of the full accomplishment of this prophecy at His second coming. It shall be “the day of the Lord” (Ps 118:24), as that first Palm Sunday was. The Jews shall then universally (Ps 118:26) say, what some of them said then, “Blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord” (compare Mt 21:9, with Mt 23:39); also “Hosanna,” or “Save now, I beseech thee.” “Palms,” the emblem of triumph, shall then also be in the hands of His people (compare Joh 12:13, with Re 7:9, 10). Then also, as on His former entry, shall be the feast of tabernacles (at which they used to draw water from Siloam, quoting Isa 12:3). Compare Ps 118:15, with Zec 14:16.

Items for Discussion

  • In what way does humility represent the idea of being a king?
  • How are you planning to use the symbolism of Easter week in the next 7 days?
  • Why should we care that Christ rode into Jerusalem on a donkey?

 

Mark 11:1-11
1 As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethpage and Bethany at the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two of his disciples, 2 saying to them, “Go to the village ahead of you, and just as you enter it, you will find a colt tied there, which no one has ever ridden. Untie it and bring it here. 3 If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you doing this?’ tell him, ‘The Lord needs it and will send it back here shortly.’” 4 They went and found a colt outside in the street, tied at a doorway. As they untied it, 5 some people standing there asked, “What are you doing, untying that colt?” 6 They answered as Jesus had told them to, and the people let them go. 7 When they brought the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks over it, he sat on it. 8 Many people spread their cloaks on the road, while others spread branches they had cut in the fields. 9 Those who went ahead and those who followed shouted, “Hosanna!” “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” 10 “Blessed is the coming kingdom of our father David!” “Hosanna in the highest!” 11 Jesus entered Jerusalem and went to the temple. He looked around at everything, but since it was already late, he went out to Bethany with the Twelve.

Background

The feast commemorates an event reported by all four Gospels (Mark 11:1-11, Matthew 21:1-11, Luke 19:28-44, and John 12:12-19) – the Triumphal Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem in the days before His death and resurrection.

Biblical Truths 3

Verse 1-11 – Christ’s coming into Jerusalem thus remarkably, shows that he was not afraid of the power and malice of his enemies. This would encourage his disciples who were full of fear. Also, that he was not disquieted at the thoughts of his approaching sufferings. But all marked his humiliation; and these matters teach us not to mind high things, but to condescend to those of low estate. How ill it becomes Christians to take state, when Christ was so far from claiming it! They welcomed his person; blessed is he that cometh, the “He that should come,” so often promised, so long expected; he comes in the name of the Lord. Let him have our best affections; he is a blessed Savior, and brings blessings to us, and blessed be He that sent him. Praises be to our God, who is in the highest heavens, over all, God blessed for ever.

Items for Discussion

  • What strikes you as important in this story?
  • In what way does this story repeat itself each Holy Week?

Discussion Challenge

  • How can we make each week of the year begin like Palm Sunday?

Notes:

  1. NIV New International Version Translations
  2. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (1871) , Commentary by A. R. FAUSSET
  3. Matthew Henry’s Commentary
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